A Vroom Vroom Moment


This post first appeared as a guest post on A Mother’s Ramblings as part of Erica’s Guest Post Week. It appears again here because I really like  it and because I have had a very busy week and haven’t had much blogging time!

My smallest boy had one of those breakthrough moments recently. The kind when you can almost hear children changing up a gear and vrooming off. The kind that makes your heart swell with pride and makes you want to shout from the rooftops.

Most children go through these moments of course and if I did start shouting on roofs I would probably be taken away and locked up for a while. But it IS miraculous and even though this is the fourth time I have seen it with my own children and the umpteenth time I have seen it as a teacher it is still amazing.

Bonus Boy moved in one leap from drawing his ‘peanut people’ (pictures of various members of the family all with one long peanut body without a separate head and with sticks for arms and legs)

to ‘proper people’ with defined heads and bodies and rectangle arms and legs with fingers and toes.

He is obviously very pleased with this and can see the difference himself because he has spent an enormous amount of time doing it ever since. We now have pupils in the centres of our very startled looking eyes.

It will be a while yet until his inner critic makes its presence felt so he is drawing for the sheer pleasure of it and it is wonderful to see. He has no limits and draws with abandon. ‘I am drawing the family Mummy and we are blue people cos I don’t have any skin pens.’

He branched out into cats,

rabbits,

hedgehogs

and smiley blue whales.

He moved onto aliens with extra legs and a complicated picture with rocket ships and moon landings and then got absorbed in drawing the sun in the sky and exotic beach scenes. All in one week!

Most children go through the same developmental stages in their drawing at more or less the same time and more or less in the same order. This shows it more clearly than I can here but I think it’s a wonderful thing to watch and it is well worth keeping a record of it!

Have you noticed the changes and stages in your child’s drawing? Are you keeping a record of it? Don’t forget to date drawings and write on them what the children call them; it’s lovely to look back on!

8 Comments

Filed under Children's Development

8 responses to “A Vroom Vroom Moment

  1. I love the ‘skin pen’ lol, but very sensible:)

    My toddler drew a circle today for the first time, and then coloured in another circle.

    Your little fella has a bit of talent btw, those are really very good, esp the animal ones.

    Jen

  2. I loved seeing these, love children’s drawings. Miss L is going through changes at the moment in her ‘style’ for sure and I’m amazed to watch it. We have a box for her special drawings that we’re kept from when she started, and a couple of particularly cool paintings are framed. When she started doing people shapes we got her to do some in acrylic paint on canvas for the wider family which all have pride of place in the various houses. Give that boy a high five from me!

    • Well done for being so organised, I was a bit useless with my first three (although I haven’t actually thrown any of it away and I did date it all so there’s time yet, maybe when thery’ve all left home!) but I am trying with Bonus Boy. It is so fascinating to watch! Doing them in acrylics as presents is a brilliant one…I’m going to do that as Christmas presents for def! Thank you. xxx

  3. What a lovely stage – I can’t wait for Little L to be expressing herself creatively and to see what she comes up with. I bought her crayons the other day but she was only interested in eating them, so it might be a bit soon x

    • Chalks are great starters too, you can get those huge chunky ones which mean a bit of a chew is not so problematic! Mine all loved our Early Learning Centre blackboard and chalking on the patio…very satisfying!

  4. I remember studying this in my human development/psychology classes at Uni (c 1986) the different stages in drawing represent the growth of the child’s understanding of other people. Up until a certain age (8?) they will always draw themselves bigger than others for example. I must see if I can hunt down the book in my bookshelf and post some more info.

    • I studied it too as part of my PGCE prior to teaching, I find it fascinating! I did language and lingusitics as part of my BA so I also note down the stuff they say….I don’t spend all my time noting and taking photos tho, LOL!

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